Reading as a Writer #6

Make sure to include a “Works Cited” page as well.
MLA FORMAT: http://williambadke.com/MLA8Guide.pdf https://lbcc.instructure.com/courses/58003/modules…
READING: https://lbcc.instructure.com/courses/58003/modules…

Annotated Bibliography on algorithms and how they affect social media using ASA citation guidelines

The paper requires 10 academic sources, you will provide full bibliographic information, as well as a paragraph of 200-250 words of “annotation” describing what the source is about for each source. You should describe very briefly what the purpose and essential content of the source is, and then discuss why the source is valuable for your paper.
I have included the requirements of the annotated bibliography below.
Requirements:

10 academic sources
Each academic source needs 200-250 words of annotation describing what the source is about and its purpose.

English 1A

Make sure that you: answer each question completely, that you use grammatically correct sentences, and number each of your answers, so there is no confusion. You may use passages and text from the reading to support your answers. If you do so, make sure to use the MLA format so that you do not get into trouble with plagiarism. You may also watch the following documentary clip for a helpful visual reference.
1.) Give examples of at least 3 panopticons that you have encountered in your every day life.
2.) Explain in detail, do you think it is acceptable to use the concept of panopticism to: separate students, keep them under surveillance even if they haven’t broken laws, and subject them to police monitoring at the schools (high schools, middles schools, and colleges) that they attend?
3.) What potential problems do you see with “panopticons” as Foucault describes them becoming the dominant institutional model in our current society?
4.) What can ordinary people do, if they find themselves within a panoptic system, and the people who are at the top of the hierarchy of power are corrupt? Explain in detail.
5.) Share your feelings, thoughts, and impressions of “panopticism.”
https://muse.jhu.edu/article/252435/pdf

Read

* Second, reflect on how these short stories are like and how they differ from other modes of composition we’ve encountered and created this semester. How do they use language? What is the relationship between writer and reader?

* Third, what do you think about the place of storytelling in the world? Is it important to you?

Who is Harper Lee and how is her life reflected in To Kill a Mockingbird

• The title page and reference page are also required, but they should not be factored into the
2-3 page length of the essay.
• Essay should conform to APA formatting and citation style.
• Use the third-person, objective voice, avoiding personal pronouns such as “I,” “you,” “we,” etc.
• Create a properly formatted APA reference page.
• Use APA format for in-text citations and reference citations for To Kill a Mockingbird and
outside sources

ENG COMP Unit 3 Discussions

Each of these writers has a particular set of insights to share regarding the nature and meaning of truth and reality. There is also an additional writing exercise.
I am including the same definitions from Unit 1 for the following terms which may help you in answering the prompts for each reading:
Ethos: the source’s credibility, the speaker’s/author’s authority
Logos: the logic used to support a claim (induction and deduction); can also be the facts and statistics used to help support the argument.
Pathos: the emotional or motivational appeals; vivid language, emotional language and numerous sensory details.
Anecdote: a short and amusing or interesting story about a real incident or person.
First Read the Important Guidelines for Discussions
then read
What is a Paragraph
Paragraph Structure and Topic Sentences
Use these materials to compose well-structured responses to the readings and verbal essays for this Unit.
Make sure that you click on the links within the prompts to outside sources in order to understand the prompts fully.
Remember that for each reading, you are required to write an original post (150 words) as well as reply post (75 words) for a classmate, for each reading. You are also to post one original response for the writing activity for this unit. You may certainly post more than the minimum amount required. Make sure to title your posts with a compelling question for your classmates for the reading response posts. Also, remember to include quotations from the readings to support your points, on order to practice this skill for your essays. Use properly-formated MLA in-text citations when including quotations
Part 1
Read “The Allegory of the Cave” by Plato in your textbook.
Don’t forget to follow the Important Guidelines for Discussions
You may find this video explanation of the reading helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RWOpQXTltA
Here is another link that helps clarify who is speaking to whom in the allegory: https://mlpp.pressbooks.pub/introphil/chapter/allegory-of-the-cave/
Write a response of at least 150 words, not including the required quotation from the reading.
Prompt:
Examine the ideas in Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave” as they connect with how we as humans perceive truth. Through this allegory, what is Plato saying about what is true, especially as it relates to group consensus? Are there any real life caves and matrices that keep people imprisoned that you can think of? In what ways we create our own prisons in our thinking? Who gains when we allow ourselves to become imprisoned through structured systems or expectations, rigid thinking, compliance, conformity, and many other ways? Are some caves created to purposefully trap humans? This allegory can metaphorically connect in most life situations from mundane daily experiences all the way to societal dynamics; allow your mind to make connections on as many levels as you can.
Part 2
King – “Letter from Birmingham Jail”
Read Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in your textbook.
“Letter From Birmingham Jail”
Find examples of MLK, Jr.’s uses of Legos, Pathos, and Ethos in this reading and discuss how each one affects you as a reader. You may also wish to discuss whether these appeals may have a different effect on the readers of today versus the readers in the time in which this letter was written.
In what way is this letter related to the ideas in “The Allegory of the Cave”? In what way is the premise that encourages us to break the law, if the law is unjust, a radical game changer?
Reread paragraph 15 on page 380-381. Read out loud the sentence that begins with the word “But.” Take note, this sentence is 310 words long! What key phrases does MLK repeat throughout this passage? Discuss how the sound of language and the use of repetition has the power to influence.

Freshman Seminar Chapter 10

..
Envy is a waste of time.
Make peace with your past so it won’t spoil the present
However good or bad a situation is, it will change.
This chapter and its Discussion Board assignment is our financial discovery in IDS 109 found in Chapter 10 of our text and WILL ALSO INCLUDE some light research outside the textbook (for example internet, financial agencies, ask your family, etc.) For this learning, I like to hone in on “pragmatics” when it comes to financial discovery. Pragmatics is just another term for the “practical” in this case towards the aspects of finance. I want my students to think heavily on “HOW WILL I MAKE SURE I AM ABLE TO RETIRE WITH FINANCIAL INDEPENDENCE

Persuasive Speech

Therefore, your topic should focus on the action you want the audience to take. The speech is 7-10 minutes in length and is worth 200 points – 25 points for the outline and 175 points for the presentation. Again, you are free to choose any topic that interests you, but there are some limitations: Nothing illegal, immoral, or unethical No overly political topics (i.e., recommending one vote for a certain candidate) No overly religious topics (i.e., attempting to persuade the audience to join a specific religion) No overly controversial topics (i.e., attempting to convince the audience to be pro-life or pro-choice) No guns, ammunition or weapons of any kind No alcohol or drugsYou ABSOLUTELY MUST present on the assigned day – there will not be time for make-up speeches.Remember – I am here for you if you need guidance or have any questions. I am also available if you need help locating sources. Don’t hesitate to email me or stop by my office. REQUIREMENTS Your speech must be 7-10 minutes in length. Going over or under the time allotment by more than 15 seconds will result in lowering your presentation grade by one (1) letter grade. You must submit a typed outline to me the day of your presentation. If I don’t get an outline, you don’t give your speech. You must have at least two types of audio/visual aids that supplement your presentation. You must have and orally cite at least 4 outside sources. MISCELLANEOUS PowerPoint may only be used for charts, graphs, or photographs. If your cell phone or pager goes off during any student’s presentation, 50 points will be deducted from your grade. If you walk in late and interrupt a classmate’s presentation, 50 points will be deducted from your grade.The Internet is a wonderful source of information; however, it is not the only source of information. You can use books, magazines, pamphlets, interviews, etc., but please make sure that your sources are credible and current. Please balance your speech against the grading rubric. If you give me what’s shown on the rubric, you will have presented a complete and well-structured speech; a complete and well-structured speech often warrants high scores!

multiple choice need help ASAP – 10 minute project

This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. “In the Reichstag a few moments ago, I saw a display commemorating this 40th anniversary of the Marshall Plan. I was struck by the sign on a burnt-out, gutted structure that was being rebuilt. I understand that Berliners of my own generation can remember seeing signs like it dotted throughout the western sectors of the city. The sign read simply: ‘The Marshall Plan is helping here to strengthen the free world.’ A strong, free world in the West, that dream became real. Japan rose from ruin to become an economic giant. Italy, France, Belgium—virtually every nation in Western Europe saw political and economic rebirth; the European Community was founded.” In this paragraph, the speaker uses juxtaposition to contrast the (5 points)
economic growth around the world compared to Berlin
intricacies of the Marshall Plan with its actual effects
experience of destruction and ruin with that of rebirth and hope
past history of the Berlin Wall with the future of the new Berlin
expectation of economic growth with the statistical reality of it
15.

need in 30 minutes multiple choice same passage – AP English Lang

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (1) Chancellor Kohl, Governing Mayor Diepgen, ladies and gentlemen: Twenty-four years ago, President John F. Kennedy visited Berlin, speaking to the people of this city and the world at the City Hall. Well, since then two other presidents have come, each in his turn, to Berlin. And today I, myself, make my second visit to your city. (2) We come to Berlin, we American presidents, because it’s our duty to speak, in this place, of freedom. But I must confess, we’re drawn here by other things as well: by the feeling of history in this city, more than 500 years older than our own nation; by the beauty of the Grunewald and the Tiergarten; most of all, by your courage and determination. Perhaps the composer Paul Lincke understood something about American presidents. You see, like so many presidents before me, I come here today because wherever I go, whatever I do: Ich hab noch einen Koffer in Berlin. [I still have a suitcase in Berlin.] (3) Our gathering today is being broadcast throughout Western Europe and North America. I understand that it is being seen and heard as well in the East. To those listening throughout Eastern Europe, a special word: Although I cannot be with you, I address my remarks to you just as surely as to those standing here before me. For I join you, as I join your fellow countrymen in the West, in this firm, this unalterable belief: Es gibt nur ein Berlin. [There is only one Berlin.] (4)Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar. (5)President von Weizsacker has said, “The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed.” Today I say: As long as the gate is closed, as long as this scar of a wall is permitted to stand, it is not the German question alone that remains open, but the question of freedom for all mankind. Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph. (6)In this season of spring in 1945, the people of Berlin emerged from their air-raid shelters to find devastation. Thousands of miles away, the people of the United States reached out to help. And in 1947 Secretary of State—as you’ve been told—George Marshall announced the creation of what would become known as the Marshall Plan. Speaking precisely 40 years ago this month, he said: “Our policy is directed not against any country or doctrine, but against hunger, poverty, desperation, and chaos.” (7)In the Reichstag a few moments ago, I saw a display commemorating this 40th anniversary of the Marshall Plan. I was struck by the sign on a burnt-out, gutted structure that was being rebuilt. I understand that Berliners of my own generation can remember seeing signs like it dotted throughout the western sectors of the city. The sign read simply: “The Marshall Plan is helping here to strengthen the free world.” A strong, free world in the West, that dream became real. Japan rose from ruin to become an economic giant. Italy, France, Belgium—virtually every nation in Western Europe saw political and economic rebirth; the European Community was founded. (8)In West Germany and here in Berlin, there took place an economic miracle, the Wirtschaftswunder. Adenauer, Erhard, Reuter, and other leaders understood the practical importance of liberty—that just as truth can flourish only when the journalist is given freedom of speech, so prosperity can come about only when the farmer and businessman enjoy economic freedom. The German leaders reduced tariffs, expanded free trade, lowered taxes. From 1950 to 1960 alone, the standard of living in West Germany and Berlin doubled. The purpose of discussing the motives of American presidents in paragraph two is to (5 points)
cite facts and figures in order to establish proof of his motives
acknowledge the failures of the leaders who have visited in the past
establish his own sincerity by aligning himself with trusted leaders
illustrate the hopelessness of repeated presidential visits to the area
reveal the futility of future presidential visits and summits to Berlin
10.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (4) Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar. A modern writer wants to adapt the ideas from this part of the speech. He wants to add relevant support for the claim made in the fourth sentence (reproduced below) of the paragraph by including a quote from a reliable source. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Each of the following sources could help to achieve this purpose EXCEPT (5 points)
a local newspaper article which interviews three families affected by the travel restrictions and highlights the negative impact on their daily lives
an excerpt from an article published in a peer-reviewed journal that analyzes how checkpoints and travel restrictions are enforced by various totalitarian states
a blog post on an international university’s website which features extensive student interviews about places they would like to travel
a governmental database that features facts and statistics regarding mental health, unemployment, and crime rates in countries where people are not free to travel
a white paper from an international human rights organization that shows decreasing quality of health among citizens prohibited from traveling across checkpoints
11.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. “President von Weizsacker has said, ‘The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed.’ Today I say: As long as the gate is closed, as long as this scar of a wall is permitted to stand, it is not the German question alone that remains open, but the question of freedom for all mankind. Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph.” In this paragraph, the speaker uses all of the following EXCEPT (5 points)
metaphor
rhetorical question
juxtaposition
connotative language
allusion
12.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (4)Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar. (5)President von Weizsacker has said, “The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed.” Today I say: As long as the gate is closed, as long as this scar of a wall is permitted to stand, it is not the German question alone that remains open, but the question of freedom for all mankind. Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph. The tone of paragraph five can best be described as (5 points)
apathetic
cautionary
agitated
somber
optimistic
13.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (1) Chancellor Kohl, Governing Mayor Diepgen, ladies and gentlemen: Twenty-four years ago, President John F. Kennedy visited Berlin, speaking to the people of this city and the world at the City Hall. (2) Well, since then two other presidents have come, each in his turn, to Berlin. (3) And today I, myself, make my second visit to your city. (4) We come to Berlin, we American presidents, because it’s our duty to speak, in this place, of freedom. (5) But I must confess, we’re drawn here by other things as well: by the feeling of history in this city, more than 500 years older than our own nation; by the beauty of the Grunewald and the Tiergarten; most of all, by your courage and determination. (6) Perhaps the composer Paul Lincke understood something about American presidents. (7) You see, like so many presidents before me, I come here today because wherever I go, whatever I do: Ich hab noch einen Koffer in Berlin. [I still have a suitcase in Berlin.] (8) Our gathering today is being broadcast throughout Western Europe and North America. (9) I understand that it is being seen and heard as well in the East. (10) To those listening throughout Eastern Europe, a special word: Although I cannot be with you, I address my remarks to you just as surely as to those standing here before me. (11) For I join you, as I join your fellow countrymen in the West, in this firm, this unalterable belief: Es gibt nur ein Berlin. [There is only one Berlin.] (12) Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. (13) From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. (14) Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. (15) Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar. Which of the following sentences, if placed before sentence 12, would provide the most effective introduction to the topic of the paragraph? (5 points)
And yet, this one and only Berlin is not free.
For this reason, Berlin is a city with tight borders.
In fact, there is one thing that has helped to keep the city unique.
Many cities have erected walls, and Berlin is no different.
Take, for example, the Berlin Wall.
14.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. “In the Reichstag a few moments ago, I saw a display commemorating this 40th anniversary of the Marshall Plan. I was struck by the sign on a burnt-out, gutted structure that was being rebuilt. I understand that Berliners of my own generation can remember seeing signs like it dotted throughout the western sectors of the city. The sign read simply: ‘The Marshall Plan is helping here to strengthen the free world.’ A strong, free world in the West, that dream became real. Japan rose from ruin to become an economic giant. Italy, France, Belgium—virtually every nation in Western Europe saw political and economic rebirth; the European Community was founded.” In this paragraph, the speaker uses juxtaposition to contrast the (5 points)
economic growth around the world compared to Berlin
intricacies of the Marshall Plan with its actual effects
experience of destruction and ruin with that of rebirth and hope
past history of the Berlin Wall with the future of the new Berlin
expectation of economic growth with the statistical reality of it
15.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control. (12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace. (13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall! The intended audience can best be described as individuals who (5 points)
already advocate the complete removal of the Berlin Wall
fully support the preservation of the Berlin Wall
understand the historical importance of the Berlin Wall
may be persuaded to support the removal of the Berlin Wall
are apathetic to the plight of the Berliners and the Berlin wall
16.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control. (12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace. (13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall! In paragraph twelve, “freedom,” “security,” and “increased human liberties” suggest that (5 points)
the people of Berlin reject the implementation of these rights
the people of the West reject these values
these ideals are sure proof of Soviet advancements in human rights
these are the ideals that are valued by the West
these ideals are used by the Soviets to control the people of Berlin
17.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control. (12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace. (13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall! Which of the following best describes the shift in tone that occurs from paragraph 11 to paragraph 13? (5 points)
Compromising to factual
Hopeful to demanding
Apologetic to emotional
Accusing to flattering
Subtle to enthusiastic
18.
Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer. This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987. (11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control. (12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace. (13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall! In paragraph 12, the speaker begins by posing two questions primarily to (5 points)
elaborate on the weak message that the changes convey
frighten the audience with the threat of extreme violence
ease the fears of the audience by revealing hopeful changes
highlight his suspicions of the sincerity behind these changes
illustrate the importance of strengthening Soviet power