Keep a “Forgetting Journal”After reading the Chapter, “Memory,” keep a one-week-long “forgetting journal.”  Record

Keep a “Forgetting Journal”
After reading the Chapter, “Memory,” keep a one-week-long “forgetting journal.”  Record specific instances of having forgotten something, such as forgetting names, appointments, intentions, where you left your keys, or routes; repetitive checking (e.g., Did I turn the stove off?); and tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon.
You should write down the situation, any factors you think are relevant to the forgetting (for example, your emotional state or focus of attention), and
some judgment as to why the forgetting occurred.
You should also note whether the forgotten material was later recalled.
Also, record unusual instances of remembering—for example, the sudden remembrance of something you thought you had forgotten.  
Describe the conditions surrounding the unexpected retrieval.  
Be sure to name the memory and forgetting principles from the textbook with your forgetting and remembering episodes.