How does the Prisoner’s Dilemma effect ethical egoism? This section is a bit more

How does the Prisoner’s Dilemma effect ethical egoism? This section is a bit more difficult, but brings up deeper defenses and criticisms of ethical egoism.
Merrill M. Flood and Melvin Dresher created The Prisoner’s Dilemma in 1950. Think of it as a puzzle that has moral implications.
 
Imagine you and Mr. Jones have been arrested. The jailer gives you the following options:
If you and Jones both confess, you will both get 5 years in prison.
If you confess but Jones does not confess, Jones gets 10 years in prison and you are immediately set free.
If you do not confess but Jones does confess, Jones will be set free immediately and you will get 10 years.
If neither confess, you will both be set free after 1 year.
here’s a chart to make this easier:
 
 
Jones Confesses
Jones doesn’t confess
I confess
5 years for both of us
Jones gets 10 years, I am free
I don’t confess
Jones is free, I get 10 years
1 year for both of us
 
 Remember think like an ethical egoist. 
The jailer tells you that Mr. Jones is being offered the same deal, but you cannot communicate with him.
so…what do you do?